Angelina Jolie Fan

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New scans today and this time from from Hello (UK) – March 2017.

Mar 7, 2017
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Someone finally uploaded a video from the ‘Good Morning America interview (Aired February 21). Here she mentions the divorce and is the source of all the articles posted online lately with Angelina’s quotes. To handle such attention for something so private, she is so professional and honest at the same time.

Feb 26, 2017
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Here is some scans from the magazine People – March 6, 2017, enjoy!

Feb 25, 2017
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Angelina was on Good Morning America on February 21st promoting “First They Killed My Father” and I can unfortunately not watch this because I don’t live in the US. You can watch the interview here and for us others we will ahve to wait for someone to hopefully upload it to YouTube 🙂

Some quotes from the interview:

Angelina Jolie says she still believes Brad Pitt is a wonderful father and their family “will be stronger” following their divorce.

The actress spoke on US television about her high-profile split from Pitt, from whom she filed for divorce in September after two years of marriage.

She told Good Morning America: “We are focusing on the health of our family. And so we will be (healthier).

‘We will be stronger when we come out of this, because that’s what we’re determined to do as a family.”

Asked if she still believed Pitt was a “wonderful father”, as she had once described him, she replied: “Of course. We will always be a family.

Source: The Independent

Feb 23, 2017
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“You start with crickets and a beer, and you then you kind of move up to tarantulas,” Angelina Jolie casually told BBC News during a recent appearance in Cambodia. While parts of the interview have already made the rounds, specifically Jolie’s quotes about her divorce from Brad Pitt, the newly released segment shows the actress, director, and humanitarian enjoying a unique activity with her children.

For the BBC interview, Jolie and twins Knox and Vivienne removed the fangs from tarantulas and fried them up with scorpions and other bugs to make a meal. “How do you flip a scorpion?” Jolie joked.

Knox seemed less than enthused about the dish. “It’s like dry chips; like flavorless chips,” he remarked after having some.
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Feb 22, 2017
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In the video I posted yesterday Angelina mentions the divorce and she handles it with grace as usual, even though you can hear that it’s obviously a sensitive subject. This clip above is just a short one and if you want to view the first one go to the previous post on this site.

This news is all over the internet today and that’s why I bring it up as well. I hope the whole family are ok and they will get to handle this privately in the future, if that is their wish.

“I don’t want to say very much about that, except to say it was a very difficult time and…and we are a family and we will always be a family, and we will get through this time and hopefully be a stronger family for it.”

Feb 22, 2017
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New video interview by the BBC World News with Angelina talking about her upcoming movie, a bit about life and the Cambodia – a country she loves!

BBC Exclusive video with Angelina in Cambodia

Click on image to view video

Angelina Jolie has spoken about how Cambodia was her “awakening”, as she premiered her new film in the country.

The actress was speaking exclusively to the BBC before the screening of First They Killed My Father, a true-life account of the Khmer Rouge genocide through the eyes of a child.

She said she hoped the film, which she directed, would help Cambodians to speak more openly about the trauma of the period.
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Feb 20, 2017
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Angelina recently interviewed the photographer Giles Duley for Citizens of Humanity. It is an important and enlightening read and there is no way that the photographs that they posted won’t affect you. What Angelina and others do to shed light on what’s going on in the world is truly inspiring and so very important!

Text by Angelina Jolie
Photography by Giles Duley

I met Giles Duley the day he introduced me to Khouloud, a Syrian refugee mother paralyzed from the neck down after being shot by a sniper, who lives in a small tent in a refugee camp in Lebanon with her loving husband and devoted children. I know that anyone meeting her would completely change how they think and feel about Syrian people and refugees. Few people will have the chance to meet her in person, but Giles’s photography introduces her to the world.

Different photographers can use the same camera or light, or all shoot the same frame. But what is different is the soul of the person behind the lens, and the moments they recognize and are drawn to—the emotional connection they make. That is what I love about Giles’s photography. Looking at his images, we can feel what he feels. It’s clear that he connects deeply to the human condition of people from all over the world. He himself has been through an ordeal. They say that adversity helps grow compassion, and Giles’s art certainly seems to bear that out.

ANGELINA JOLIE: You describe yourself as a “storyteller”—what is it about the nature and power of stories that inspires you?

GILES DULEY: Stories have incredible power. I don’t truly understand, but they have a mojo, a magic that helps us to comprehend the world and others. Since the birth of humankind we have been telling stories to each other; from campfires, cave paintings, books and film, storytelling is central to our culture and being. I follow in that tradition. I’m not a journalist—I don’t focus on facts and figures. I’m interested in our shared humanity, our empathy for others and the details in life that help us to connect.
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Feb 9, 2017
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Angelina Jolie is giving a first look at her new film and longtime passion project, First They Killed My Father which she’s releasing together with Netflix.

The film is based on the autobiography of Cambodian human rights activist and friend of Jolie’s Loung Ung, and tells the true story of the devastation inflicted on Cambodia by the Khmer Rouge communist party in the 1970s.

The world premiere of First They Killed My Father will be held in Siem Reap on Feb. 18, and will released globally via Netflix later this year.

Read an article about the project published on January 11, 2017 by The Guardian.

Feb 3, 2017
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Angelina Jolie meets refugees

There is many reasons to admire Angelina. Not only for the talented actress she truly is and the person she seems to be – but for her endless support and work for people in need. She got an article published by The New York Times and especially during these times it’s a every important read!

*And when you’re at it, read an article by Angelina published in 2015 as well.

Refugees are men, women and children caught in the fury of war, or the cross hairs of persecution. Far from being terrorists, they are often the victims of terrorism themselves.

I’m proud of our country’s history of giving shelter to the most vulnerable people. Americans have shed blood to defend the idea that human rights transcend culture, geography, ethnicity and religion. The decision to suspend the resettlement of refugees to the United States and deny entry to citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries has been met with shock by our friends around the world precisely because of this record.

The global refugee crisis and the threat from terrorism make it entirely justifiable that we consider how best to secure our borders. Every government must balance the needs of its citizens with its international responsibilities. But our response must be measured and should be based on facts, not fear.

As the mother of six children, who were all born in foreign lands and are proud American citizens, I very much want our country to be safe for them, and all our nation’s children. But I also want to know that refugee children who qualify for asylum will always have a chance to plead their case to a compassionate America. And that we can manage our security without writing off citizens of entire countries — even babies — as unsafe to visit our country by virtue of geography or religion.

It is simply not true that our borders are overrun or that refugees are admitted to the United States without close scrutiny.

Refugees are in fact subject to the highest level of screening of any category of traveler to the United States. This includes months of interviews, and security checks carried out by the F.B.I., the National Counterterrorism Center, the Department of Homeland Security and the State Department.

Furthermore, only the most vulnerable people are put forward for resettlement in the first place: survivors of torture, and women and children at risk or who might not survive without urgent, specialized medical assistance. I have visited countless camps and cities where hundreds of thousands of refugees are barely surviving and every family has suffered. When the United Nations Refugee Agency identifies those among them who are most in need of protection, we can be sure that they deserve the safety, shelter and fresh start that countries like ours can offer.

And in fact only a minuscule fraction — less than 1 percent — of all refugees in the world are ever resettled in the United States or any other country. There are more than 65 million refugees and displaced people worldwide. Nine out of 10 refugees live in poor and middle-income countries, not in rich Western nations. There are 2.8 million Syrian refugees in Turkey alone. Only about 18,000 Syrians have been resettled in America since 2011.

This disparity points to another, more sobering reality. If we send a message that it is acceptable to close the door to refugees, or to discriminate among them on the basis of religion, we are playing with fire. We are lighting a fuse that will burn across continents, inviting the very instability we seek to protect ourselves against.

We are already living through the worst refugee crisis since World War II. There are countries in Africa and the Middle East bursting at the seams with refugees. For generations American diplomats have joined the United Nations in urging those countries to keep their borders open, and to uphold international standards on the treatment of refugees. Many do just that with exemplary generosity.

What will be our response if other countries use national security as an excuse to start turning people away, or deny rights on the basis of religion? What could this mean for the Rohingya from Myanmar, or for Somali refugees, or millions of other displaced people who happen to be Muslim? And what does this do to the absolute prohibition in international law against discrimination on the grounds of faith or religion?

The truth is that even if the numbers of refugees we take in are small, and we do the bare minimum, we do it to uphold the United Nations conventions and standards we fought so hard to build after World War II, for the sake of our own security.

If we Americans say that these obligations are no longer important, we risk a free-for-all in which even more refugees are denied a home, guaranteeing more instability, hatred and violence.

If we create a tier of second-class refugees, implying Muslims are less worthy of protection, we fuel extremism abroad, and at home we undermine the ideal of diversity cherished by Democrats and Republicans alike: “America is committed to the world because so much of the world is inside America,” in the words of Ronald Reagan. If we divide people beyond our borders, we divide ourselves.

The lesson of the years we have spent fighting terrorism since Sept. 11 is that every time we depart from our values we worsen the very problem we are trying to contain. We must never allow our values to become the collateral damage of a search for greater security. Shutting our door to refugees or discriminating among them is not our way, and does not make us safer. Acting out of fear is not our way. Targeting the weakest does not show strength.

We all want to keep our country safe. So we must look to the sources of the terrorist threat — to the conflicts that give space and oxygen to groups like the Islamic State, and the despair and lawlessness on which they feed. We have to make common cause with people of all faiths and backgrounds fighting the same threat and seeking the same security. This is where I would hope any president of our great nation would lead on behalf of all Americans.

By Angelina Jolie
February 2, 2017

Feb 3, 2017
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