Angelina Jolie Fan

EST 2014 | The Ultimate Angelina Jolie Fansite

Scans from the English and the Spanish version of the Hello magazine. Enjoy the read!

Hello – March 20, 2017

Hello (Spain) – March 2017

Mar 27, 2017
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New scans today and this time from from Hello (UK) – March 2017.

Mar 7, 2017
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Here is some scans from the magazine People – March 6, 2017, enjoy!

Feb 25, 2017
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Angelina Jolie meets refugees

There is many reasons to admire Angelina. Not only for the talented actress she truly is and the person she seems to be – but for her endless support and work for people in need. She got an article published by The New York Times and especially during these times it’s a every important read!

*And when you’re at it, read an article by Angelina published in 2015 as well.

Refugees are men, women and children caught in the fury of war, or the cross hairs of persecution. Far from being terrorists, they are often the victims of terrorism themselves.

I’m proud of our country’s history of giving shelter to the most vulnerable people. Americans have shed blood to defend the idea that human rights transcend culture, geography, ethnicity and religion. The decision to suspend the resettlement of refugees to the United States and deny entry to citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries has been met with shock by our friends around the world precisely because of this record.

The global refugee crisis and the threat from terrorism make it entirely justifiable that we consider how best to secure our borders. Every government must balance the needs of its citizens with its international responsibilities. But our response must be measured and should be based on facts, not fear.

As the mother of six children, who were all born in foreign lands and are proud American citizens, I very much want our country to be safe for them, and all our nation’s children. But I also want to know that refugee children who qualify for asylum will always have a chance to plead their case to a compassionate America. And that we can manage our security without writing off citizens of entire countries — even babies — as unsafe to visit our country by virtue of geography or religion.

It is simply not true that our borders are overrun or that refugees are admitted to the United States without close scrutiny.

Refugees are in fact subject to the highest level of screening of any category of traveler to the United States. This includes months of interviews, and security checks carried out by the F.B.I., the National Counterterrorism Center, the Department of Homeland Security and the State Department.

Furthermore, only the most vulnerable people are put forward for resettlement in the first place: survivors of torture, and women and children at risk or who might not survive without urgent, specialized medical assistance. I have visited countless camps and cities where hundreds of thousands of refugees are barely surviving and every family has suffered. When the United Nations Refugee Agency identifies those among them who are most in need of protection, we can be sure that they deserve the safety, shelter and fresh start that countries like ours can offer.

And in fact only a minuscule fraction — less than 1 percent — of all refugees in the world are ever resettled in the United States or any other country. There are more than 65 million refugees and displaced people worldwide. Nine out of 10 refugees live in poor and middle-income countries, not in rich Western nations. There are 2.8 million Syrian refugees in Turkey alone. Only about 18,000 Syrians have been resettled in America since 2011.

This disparity points to another, more sobering reality. If we send a message that it is acceptable to close the door to refugees, or to discriminate among them on the basis of religion, we are playing with fire. We are lighting a fuse that will burn across continents, inviting the very instability we seek to protect ourselves against.

We are already living through the worst refugee crisis since World War II. There are countries in Africa and the Middle East bursting at the seams with refugees. For generations American diplomats have joined the United Nations in urging those countries to keep their borders open, and to uphold international standards on the treatment of refugees. Many do just that with exemplary generosity.

What will be our response if other countries use national security as an excuse to start turning people away, or deny rights on the basis of religion? What could this mean for the Rohingya from Myanmar, or for Somali refugees, or millions of other displaced people who happen to be Muslim? And what does this do to the absolute prohibition in international law against discrimination on the grounds of faith or religion?

The truth is that even if the numbers of refugees we take in are small, and we do the bare minimum, we do it to uphold the United Nations conventions and standards we fought so hard to build after World War II, for the sake of our own security.

If we Americans say that these obligations are no longer important, we risk a free-for-all in which even more refugees are denied a home, guaranteeing more instability, hatred and violence.

If we create a tier of second-class refugees, implying Muslims are less worthy of protection, we fuel extremism abroad, and at home we undermine the ideal of diversity cherished by Democrats and Republicans alike: “America is committed to the world because so much of the world is inside America,” in the words of Ronald Reagan. If we divide people beyond our borders, we divide ourselves.

The lesson of the years we have spent fighting terrorism since Sept. 11 is that every time we depart from our values we worsen the very problem we are trying to contain. We must never allow our values to become the collateral damage of a search for greater security. Shutting our door to refugees or discriminating among them is not our way, and does not make us safer. Acting out of fear is not our way. Targeting the weakest does not show strength.

We all want to keep our country safe. So we must look to the sources of the terrorist threat — to the conflicts that give space and oxygen to groups like the Islamic State, and the despair and lawlessness on which they feed. We have to make common cause with people of all faiths and backgrounds fighting the same threat and seeking the same security. This is where I would hope any president of our great nation would lead on behalf of all Americans.

By Angelina Jolie
February 2, 2017

Feb 3, 2017
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One sweltering afternoon last January on a film set in the Cambodian countryside, a local man approached Angelina Jolie with a large bucket of leeches. Jolie peered into the bucket and picked out one of the writhing creatures, studying it as it found its way to one of the prominent veins on the back of her hand and locked on. As it started to gorge on her blood, she carried it over to her nine-year-old lead actor, Sareum Srey Moch, who was sitting in a canvas chair in the shade of a tree.

“This is what a real one looks like,” she said. Sareum wrinkled her nose and stared at the leech. “Does it suck your blood?” the girl asked. Jolie’s 13-year-old son, Pax, on crutches after breaking his foot in a jet-ski accident, hobbled over with his camera to take a closer look.

“Yes it sucks your blood,” Jolie answered after a slight hesitation, already resigned to the likelihood that live leeches might be a step too far for this young actor. She ordered a return to plan A, a box full of dozens of pretend leeches made out of black vinyl and double-pinned to a cardboard backing like biological specimens. The crew experimented with gluing plastic worms of different shapes to Sareum’s leg until both the child actor and Jolie agreed that it looked right. Actor and director high-fived each other and the girl walked back to the paddy field for her next scene.

Sareum plays the part of Loung Ung, who was only five when the Khmer Rouge, as Cambodia’s communist party was known, swept into the capital Phnom Penh in 1975. Over the next four years, they drove its population out into the countryside, executing all those perceived as class enemies. More than two million people were killed, out of a total population of seven million. Ung’s father and mother and two of her sisters were executed.

At nine, Ung escaped to Thailand with her older brother, and they arrived in the US as refugees soon afterwards, with the help of a church foundation. At 30, she wrote her autobiography, First They Killed My Father. On set, Loung Ung, now aged 46, watched playbacks on a screen with Jolie in a small black tent, next to a little corral where brown cattle were being kept for farm scenes. The two women have been friends for 16 years and Ung, who co-wrote the screenplay, was working as a consultant on the set.
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Jan 12, 2017
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Here are scans from the December 5th issue of Entertainment Weekly magazine, plus the portraits. Thanks Luciana and Claudia.


Nov 30, 2014
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Angelina Jolie is featured on the December 1st issue of Time Magazine, here are scans and the photoshoot:


Nov 26, 2014
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Angelina Jolie and Jack O’Connell are on the cover of the December 5th issue of Entertainment Weekly, here’s the cover:


Nov 26, 2014
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Hello everyone! I’ve added scans from the December issue of the Vanity Fair Magazine, plus the photoshoot. The pictures aren’t fully clear of text, but I’ll try to get them if I can! Enjoy!


Nov 13, 2014
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Angelina Jolie is the cover of the December issue of Vanity Fair. Here’s a preview and the cover from the Vanity Fair website:

“It does feel different,” Angelina Jolie tells Vanity Fair contributing editor Janine di Giovanni, of her relationship with Brad Pitt since their surprise wedding, this past August. “It feels nice to be husband and wife.”

Jolie also spoke to di Giovanni about the vows the couple’s children wrote for them, saying, “They did not expect us never to fight, but they made us promise to always say, ‘Sorry,’ if we do. So they said, ‘Do you?,’ and we said, ‘We do!’ ”

Jolie’s prolific political activities suggest to di Giovanni that she may at some point try her hand at elected or appointed office. “When you work as a humanitarian, you are conscious that politics have to be considered,” she tells di Giovanni. “Because if you really want to make an extreme change, then you have a responsibility.” Jolie then catches herself. “But I honestly don’t know in what role I would be more useful—I am conscious of what I do for a living, and that [could] make it less possible.”

In di Giovanni’s last meeting with Jolie, however, Jolie’s opinion seems to have shifted. When directly asked if she sees herself pursuing a life in politics, diplomacy, or public service, Jolie says, “I am open.”

Jolie talks extensively about her experience befriending the subject of her upcoming feature, Unbroken, Louis Zamperini, a scrappy Italian American kid turned Olympic runner turned World War II airman turned hero. Jolie was at Zamperini’s bedside for some of the last days of his life, and managed to show him an early cut of the film. “It was an extremely moving experience,” she tells di Giovanni, in tears, “to watch someone watching their own life . . . someone so physically strong . . . and they are at the stage where their body is giving up.”

She continues, “And yet we laughed together, and talked about his mom. And being a man of such faith, he talked about all the people he believed he would be seeing on the other side. And that it would bring him peace. After a life of fighting, he could rest.”

At one point, Jolie recalls, Zamperini seemed to be failing. Then, as if from some deep reservoir of resolve, he rebounded. “[The doctors] said he was training to breathe on his own. And that’s what he always told me—you train, you fight harder than those other guys, and you win. You can take it. You make it.” At this point, Jolie grows more emotional, then collects herself. “Poetically, he stayed 40 days and 40 nights.” And then he passed on.

As for what’s next, Jolie is preparing to direct and star with Brad Pitt in By the Sea. She tells di Giovanni, “A few friends asked if we were crazy . . . [A film about] a married couple going through some difficulties . . . and I’m directing him.”

The full story is available November 6 in the digital editions, and the magazine will be on national newsstands on November 11.

Nov 4, 2014
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