Angelina Jolie Fan

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Angelina had a meeting with the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, at Lambeth Palace in London on Thursday, March 16 and they have worked and met eachother before. Here is an article regarding the meeting and two new photos!

Angelina Jolie is teaming up with the head of the Church of England.

The actress and humanitarian met with the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, at Lambeth Palace in London on Thursday, where the two discussed issues surrounding sexual violence, the refugee crisis and South Sudan.

Jolie met with the archbishop in her capacity as a special envoy for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. She was appointed to the post in 2012.

The actress and archbishop have worked together before, and met in 2015 at the opening of the Center for Peace and Security at the London School of Economics, where she spoke to religious leaders from around the world about ending sexual violence as a weapon of war.
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“The role of the U.N. Secretary General’s Special Envoy on Refugees, Angelina Jolie Pitt, is one that has been extraordinary,” Welby said of Jolie at the time. “What she said just now sums up so beautifully the issues we are facing, and puts it so precisely in terms of the challenge that there is. It’s wonderful that she has committed her time, her energy, and has taken great personal risks in order to be able to speak authentically as to what she’s done.”

Source: People

Mar 17, 2017
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Busy days for Angelina! Yesterday she was at the United Nations in Geneva talking at the annual Sergio Vieira de Mello lecture. I’ve posted two shorter versions of the lecture and if you want to see the whole clip you can do it when you click at “read more”.

She was well read as usual, we wouldn’t expect less. And it is so very important to speak up during these hard times. So listen to the clips and get motivated and perhaps get to know more about what’s going on in the world.

And besides this, as always – Ms. Jolie looked absolutely stunning, in a blue dress!

UNHCR has published her full speech and you can read it here!

Two shorter videos of Angelina during the lecture:

U.N. refugee agency special envoy Angelina Jolie made an impassioned plea on Wednesday for internationalism in the face of wars driving people from their homes and a “rising tide of nationalism masquerading as patriotism”.

The Hollywood actress, speaking at the United Nations in Geneva, called for a renewed commitment to the “imperfect” world body and to diplomacy to settle conflicts.

“If governments and leaders are not keeping that flame of internationalism alive today, then we as citizens must,” Jolie said in the annual Sergio Vieira de Mello lecture honoring the veteran U.N. aid worker killed in a Baghdad bombing in 2003.
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Mar 16, 2017
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There is always something new to be amazed by or proud of when it comes to Angelina. The reason for her to be in London, UK was to have a lecture at the London School for Economics yesterday on March 14. This weeks celebrates the fifth anniversary of the Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative.

She looked wonderful in her beige coat and was all smiles on her way to the lecture. She was quoted saying:

“I’m a little nervous, feeling butterflies. I hope I do well. This is very important to me.”

And I’m more than certain that she did well and I’m also sure the students were trilled to have Angelina there and the week earlier Lord Hague was there as well giving a lecture. What a privilege!

Here is some photos of Angelina and also two pics that the students took!

Angelina Jolie today said she was “feeling butterflies” ahead of her first lecture as a visiting professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

The actress and film-maker, who co-founded the Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative, was set to tell students at the LSE’s Centre for Women, Peace and Security today about her experience in the field and how sexual violence is used as a tool of war.

“I’m a little nervous, feeling butterflies,” she told the Evening Standard beforehand. “I hope I do well. This is very important to me.”

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Mar 15, 2017
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Angelina recently interviewed the photographer Giles Duley for Citizens of Humanity. It is an important and enlightening read and there is no way that the photographs that they posted won’t affect you. What Angelina and others do to shed light on what’s going on in the world is truly inspiring and so very important!

Text by Angelina Jolie
Photography by Giles Duley

I met Giles Duley the day he introduced me to Khouloud, a Syrian refugee mother paralyzed from the neck down after being shot by a sniper, who lives in a small tent in a refugee camp in Lebanon with her loving husband and devoted children. I know that anyone meeting her would completely change how they think and feel about Syrian people and refugees. Few people will have the chance to meet her in person, but Giles’s photography introduces her to the world.

Different photographers can use the same camera or light, or all shoot the same frame. But what is different is the soul of the person behind the lens, and the moments they recognize and are drawn to—the emotional connection they make. That is what I love about Giles’s photography. Looking at his images, we can feel what he feels. It’s clear that he connects deeply to the human condition of people from all over the world. He himself has been through an ordeal. They say that adversity helps grow compassion, and Giles’s art certainly seems to bear that out.

ANGELINA JOLIE: You describe yourself as a “storyteller”—what is it about the nature and power of stories that inspires you?

GILES DULEY: Stories have incredible power. I don’t truly understand, but they have a mojo, a magic that helps us to comprehend the world and others. Since the birth of humankind we have been telling stories to each other; from campfires, cave paintings, books and film, storytelling is central to our culture and being. I follow in that tradition. I’m not a journalist—I don’t focus on facts and figures. I’m interested in our shared humanity, our empathy for others and the details in life that help us to connect.
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Feb 9, 2017
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Angelina Jolie meets refugees

There is many reasons to admire Angelina. Not only for the talented actress she truly is and the person she seems to be – but for her endless support and work for people in need. She got an article published by The New York Times and especially during these times it’s a every important read!

*And when you’re at it, read an article by Angelina published in 2015 as well.

Refugees are men, women and children caught in the fury of war, or the cross hairs of persecution. Far from being terrorists, they are often the victims of terrorism themselves.

I’m proud of our country’s history of giving shelter to the most vulnerable people. Americans have shed blood to defend the idea that human rights transcend culture, geography, ethnicity and religion. The decision to suspend the resettlement of refugees to the United States and deny entry to citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries has been met with shock by our friends around the world precisely because of this record.

The global refugee crisis and the threat from terrorism make it entirely justifiable that we consider how best to secure our borders. Every government must balance the needs of its citizens with its international responsibilities. But our response must be measured and should be based on facts, not fear.

As the mother of six children, who were all born in foreign lands and are proud American citizens, I very much want our country to be safe for them, and all our nation’s children. But I also want to know that refugee children who qualify for asylum will always have a chance to plead their case to a compassionate America. And that we can manage our security without writing off citizens of entire countries — even babies — as unsafe to visit our country by virtue of geography or religion.

It is simply not true that our borders are overrun or that refugees are admitted to the United States without close scrutiny.

Refugees are in fact subject to the highest level of screening of any category of traveler to the United States. This includes months of interviews, and security checks carried out by the F.B.I., the National Counterterrorism Center, the Department of Homeland Security and the State Department.

Furthermore, only the most vulnerable people are put forward for resettlement in the first place: survivors of torture, and women and children at risk or who might not survive without urgent, specialized medical assistance. I have visited countless camps and cities where hundreds of thousands of refugees are barely surviving and every family has suffered. When the United Nations Refugee Agency identifies those among them who are most in need of protection, we can be sure that they deserve the safety, shelter and fresh start that countries like ours can offer.

And in fact only a minuscule fraction — less than 1 percent — of all refugees in the world are ever resettled in the United States or any other country. There are more than 65 million refugees and displaced people worldwide. Nine out of 10 refugees live in poor and middle-income countries, not in rich Western nations. There are 2.8 million Syrian refugees in Turkey alone. Only about 18,000 Syrians have been resettled in America since 2011.

This disparity points to another, more sobering reality. If we send a message that it is acceptable to close the door to refugees, or to discriminate among them on the basis of religion, we are playing with fire. We are lighting a fuse that will burn across continents, inviting the very instability we seek to protect ourselves against.

We are already living through the worst refugee crisis since World War II. There are countries in Africa and the Middle East bursting at the seams with refugees. For generations American diplomats have joined the United Nations in urging those countries to keep their borders open, and to uphold international standards on the treatment of refugees. Many do just that with exemplary generosity.

What will be our response if other countries use national security as an excuse to start turning people away, or deny rights on the basis of religion? What could this mean for the Rohingya from Myanmar, or for Somali refugees, or millions of other displaced people who happen to be Muslim? And what does this do to the absolute prohibition in international law against discrimination on the grounds of faith or religion?

The truth is that even if the numbers of refugees we take in are small, and we do the bare minimum, we do it to uphold the United Nations conventions and standards we fought so hard to build after World War II, for the sake of our own security.

If we Americans say that these obligations are no longer important, we risk a free-for-all in which even more refugees are denied a home, guaranteeing more instability, hatred and violence.

If we create a tier of second-class refugees, implying Muslims are less worthy of protection, we fuel extremism abroad, and at home we undermine the ideal of diversity cherished by Democrats and Republicans alike: “America is committed to the world because so much of the world is inside America,” in the words of Ronald Reagan. If we divide people beyond our borders, we divide ourselves.

The lesson of the years we have spent fighting terrorism since Sept. 11 is that every time we depart from our values we worsen the very problem we are trying to contain. We must never allow our values to become the collateral damage of a search for greater security. Shutting our door to refugees or discriminating among them is not our way, and does not make us safer. Acting out of fear is not our way. Targeting the weakest does not show strength.

We all want to keep our country safe. So we must look to the sources of the terrorist threat — to the conflicts that give space and oxygen to groups like the Islamic State, and the despair and lawlessness on which they feed. We have to make common cause with people of all faiths and backgrounds fighting the same threat and seeking the same security. This is where I would hope any president of our great nation would lead on behalf of all Americans.

By Angelina Jolie
February 2, 2017

Feb 3, 2017
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